Learning to Love (Ourselves and Others)

Often times, the most challenging person to accept is ourselves. We learn that our own self can be one of the hardest people out of everyone to love. Yet, when we come to realize that God already knows us, really relationally knows us as we are, and yet still loves us, maybe we can look at our messiness, and brokenness and even venture into these dark places without fear. We can in turn see the dark places in others and love beyond our humanly capacities.

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An Interview with Josh Porter from Showbread

“People who follow Jesus that make art are also thought of not being that creative, as in not really having anything honest to say.” With the release of their final album “Showbread is Showdead”, we here at ECCLESIAM got to catch up with Josh Porter from Showbread on his thoughts on the intersection of art and faith.

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Pentecostals, Millennials, and a Forecast of Scholarship

As the Pentecostal Movement has aged, those who identify themselves as Pentecostals have begun to create robust and distinctly Pentecostal theologies, hermeneutics, ethics, and more to help the movement navigate its ways through an ever shifting cultural ethos. To intertwine this unique and growing field of Pentecostal scholarship with the spirituality of the movement’s young Pentecostals will help create a bright future for the movement as we move further into the 21st century.

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Daily Grace in Christian Life

We’ve all known a friend that uses the phrase, “Well, God will forgive me” right after they do something they know they shouldn’t have done. While the phrase is correct, this attitude can begin to create a “cheap grace” that doesn’t value the gift that was given to each of us. Grace is a serious subject matter in the life of a Christ follower. It should not be taken lightly but should be something that we value and embrace.

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Christians, Politics, and Thoughts on Obedience

Many American Christian leaders recognize their influence and have turned to the Bible to find support to persuade their followers in their voting and action. However, is this what we are called to do as pastors (and as the church)? Understanding our impact through our commitment to following Christ may offer a more productive way to influence our nation.

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Southeastern University